Saturday, March 26, 2011

FBI Joins the Hunt for Accused Money-Launderer "Bobby Thompson"

"A man who called himself Bobby Thompson — which turned out to be a stolen identity — is under investigation by the FBI and several states after the newspaper revealed that Thompson's Tampa-based U.S. Navy Veterans Association was a sham... Now, after being indicted by an Ohio grand jury, the man called John Doe by authorities is wanted on charges of identity theft, racketeering, money laundering and stealing more than $1 million from Ohio residents alone."---The Saint Petersburg Times (3-19-11)

The Saint Petersburg Times (3-10-11) reveals that the FBI is also investigating the case of "Bobby Thompson" (above), who is wanted on charges of identity theft, racketeering, money laundering and stealing millions of dollars from unsuspecting citizens who believed they were donating to the Navy Veterans' Charity. This case is also being investigated by the IRS, the Department of Veterans' Affairs, and the Attorney Generals of several states. The case of "Bobby Thompson" was also reported by America's Most Wanted on 3-19-11. [See all the articles in the Saint Petersburg Times' special report "U.S. Navy Veterans' Association: Under the Radar."]

"Bobby Thompson" gave $55,000 to Virginia's Attorney General Cuccinelli. Soon after, Virginia made a law exempting military charities from reporting on their operations to the state of Virginia and control of Virginia's Office of Consumer Affairs was put under Cuccinelli loyalist Delegate Matt Lohr. Attorney General Cuccinelli also persecutes the climate scientist Dr. Michael Mann and tries to sue the EPA for regulating CO2.

Harrisonburg News (6-25-10) reports:

During the last regular session of General Assembly, Sen. Mark Obenshain and then Del. Matt Lohr introduced legislation (SB388 and HB965, respectively) that would have moved “investigative and consumer complaint and dispute resolution functions for certain consumer protection laws from the Office of Consumer Affairs within the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (VDACS) to the Division of Consumer Counsel within the Office of the Attorney General."

Both bills were killed in committee. Two months later, Lohr was appointed commissioner of VDACS, initiating last week’s special election to fill his seat in the House of Delegates.

This is not the only time that "Bobby Thompson" has donated to an Attorney General who was involved with a state's Office of Consumer Affairs.

The Saint Petersburg Times (7-15-10) reports:

[Betty] Montgomery was Ohio Attorney General from 1995 to 2003 and was running for that office again in 2006 when her campaign reported Bobby C. Thompson's $500 check.

She lost that election and now works at Mac Murray, Petersen & Shuster, the law firm that represented the Navy Veterans until this week. Helen Mac Murray had been general counsel for the Navy Veterans since last June. While Montgomery was attorney general, Mac Murray was chief of Montgomery's Consumer Protection section.

The Saint Petersburg Times (3-19-11) reports:

The mysterious subject of a years-long St. Petersburg Times investigation appears on America's Most Wanted this weekend.

A man who called himself Bobby Thompson — which turned out to be a stolen identity — is under investigation by the FBI and several states after the newspaper revealed that Thompson's Tampa-based U.S. Navy Veterans Association was a sham.

Times reporter Jeff Testerman and researcher John Martin tried to find the 85 officers listed on Navy Veterans' tax returns, as well as some evidence of a claimed membership of 66,000 and beneficial gifts in the tens of millions of dollars.

It all led back to one man — "Thompson," who since vanished.

Now, after being indicted by an Ohio grand jury, the man called John Doe by authorities is wanted on charges of identity theft, racketeering, money laundering and stealing more than $1 million from Ohio residents alone.

"There are just so many questions," said William Clark, who produced tonight's Most Wanted episode. "What were you thinking? How did you do this? Who are you?"

The oddness of the story, in addition to Thompson's eccentric appearance in photographs with high-ranking officials including former President George W. Bush, sparked Clark's interest.

"He didn't have a past. He doesn't have a future, a present even. That's what's so weird," Clark said. "Nobody has been able to piece together what his life is really about." (See the full text.)

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