Thursday, November 12, 2009

Walter Reed officials "worried they might be 'discriminating' against Hasan because of his seemingly extremist Islamic beliefs"

"Put it this way," says one official familiar with the conversations that took place. "Everybody felt that if you were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, you would not want Nidal Hasan in your foxhole."---NPR (11-11-09) citing a doctor at Walter Reed Army Hospital

As I have noted in my two previous posts, both security and military officials seem to have dropped the ball in the case of the mass-murdering Islamist terrorist and traitor Dr. Nidal Hasan. Even though the Army knew Dr. Hasan was an unstable, anti-American Islamist and the FBI knew he was communicating with our enemies, they didn't do anything. Because the Army and FBI didn't act, thirteen soldiers were needlessly slaughtered, and more than 30 were injured.

National Public Radio (11-11-09) has published an amazing article about the mass-murdering Islamist terrorist Dr. Nidal Hasan. The article claims that officials at Walter Reed Army Hospital saw that Dr. Hasan was dangerous but didn't do anything. They just passed him along to Fort Hood. The Walter Reed officials "worried they might be 'discriminating' against Hasan because of his seemingly extremist Islamic beliefs." Actually, they are supposed to discrimate against people with extremist Islamic beliefs because those are our enemies.

National Public Radio (11-11-09) reports:

Starting in the spring of 2008, key officials from Walter Reed Army Medical Center and the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences held a series of meetings and conversations, in part about Maj. Nidal Hasan, the man accused of killing 13 people and wounding dozens of others last week during a shooting spree at Fort Hood. One of the questions they pondered: Was Hasan psychotic?

"Put it this way," says one official familiar with the conversations that took place. "Everybody felt that if you were deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, you would not want Nidal Hasan in your foxhole"...

Both fellow students and faculty were deeply troubled by Hasan's behavior — which they variously called disconnected, aloof, paranoid, belligerent, and schizoid. The officials say he antagonized some students and faculty by espousing what they perceived to be extremist Islamic views. His supervisors at Walter Reed had even reprimanded him for telling at least one patient that "Islam can save your soul"...

One official involved in the conversations had reportedly told colleagues that he worried that if Hasan deployed to Iraq or Afghanistan, he might leak secret military information to Islamic extremists. Another official reportedly wondered aloud to colleagues whether Hasan might be capable of committing fratricide, like the Muslim U.S. Army sergeant who, in 2003, killed two fellow soldiers and injured 14 others by setting off grenades at a base in Kuwait.

...[S]ome of Hasan's supervisors and instructors had told colleagues that they repeatedly bent over backward to support and encourage him, because they didn't have clear evidence that he was unstable, and they worried they might be "discriminating" against Hasan because of his seemingly extremist Islamic beliefs.

...[T]he officials involved in deliberations this year reportedly were not aware, as some top Walter Reed officials were, that intelligence analysts had been tracking Hasan's e-mails with at least one suspected Islamic extremist since December 2008.
And finally, Hasan was about to leave Walter Reed and USUHS for good and transfer to Fort Hood, in Texas. Fort Hood has more psychiatrists and other mental specialists than some other Army bases, so officials figured there would be plenty of co-workers who would support Hasan — and monitor him.

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