Sunday, November 15, 2009

Rapists and Murderers in the American Indian Movement

"There was talk of the rape of young white and Indian women at the [American Indian Movement (AIM)] camp. One Lakota elder, fluent in the Lakota language, said during the occupation, 'All they do is smoke dope and make the women take their pants down.'"---Lakota journalist Tim Giago

The AIMsters John Graham and Thelma Rios have now been indicted by the state of South Dakota for the December 1975 kidnapping and murder of the Canadian Indian Anna Mae Aquash. Graham has also been charged with raping Aquash.

Richard Marshall, the former bodyguard of the buffoonish AIMster-turned-actor Russell Means, will stand trial for the Aquash murder separately in federal court. Marshall is accused of providing Graham with the gun that was used to kill Aquash. Russell Means's former bodyguard is a previously convicted killer who served time for the murder of Martin Mountileaux in the men's room of a Scenic, South Dakota, bar.

But the rape-murder of Anna Mae Aquash may not have been an isolated incident for the AIMsters. There are allegations that during the 1973 occupation of the Lakota village of Wounded Knee in South Dakota, American Indian movement "heroes" may have also raped and even murdered a number of young women.

The fake Indian, fake scholar, discredited ex-professor, and AIM apologist Ward Churchill describes the AIM's terrorist take-over of an American Indian town and their reign of terror as if it were a slumber party. Compare Ward Churchill's whitewash of the 1973 occupation of Wounded Knee with Mrs. Gildersleeve's eyewitness testimony of her family's ordeal at the hands of the AIMsters.

The Lakota journalist Tim Giago explains:

The mainstream media made heroes of the occupiers of Wounded Knee. They became legends in their own minds. Even today there is still talk among the Lakota people of Pine Ridge that some terrible things took place within the AIM camp at Wounded Knee. There were rumors of other murders within the confines of the encampment. There was talk of the rape of young white and Indian women at the camp. One Lakota elder, fluent in the Lakota language, said during the occupation, "All they do is smoke dope and make the women take their pants down." There is a strong suspicion among some Pine Ridge residents that there are other bodies buried in secret graves at Wounded Knee including the body of an African American man named Perry Ray Robinson who apparently entered the camp at Wounded Knee in 1973 and has not be seen or heard from since.

Retired FBI agent Joe Trimbach and his son John, the authors of American Indian Mafia, say that the AIMster Leonard Crow Dog is worried that the remains of people "disappeared" by the American Indian Movement (AIM) during the 1973 occupation of Wounded Knee might be discovered buried in the ruins of the village.

The Trimbachs observe:

In one of his more lucid moments, AIM's...spiritual advisor, Leonard Crow Dog, warned that at least seven spirits haunt the village ruins. He urged a land purchase of the area in order to prevent a gastly discovery. To illustrate, Crow Dog drew lines in the sand while explaining to this Indian, "There's a Mexican, an Italian, a black man, three white women..." Could these be the forgotten souls AIM leaders do not want people to know about? Was it feared their departure might compromise internal security, should they decide to cooperate with authorities once safely inside a hospital recovery room?...With the possible exception of [the black man Perry Ray Robinson], the deaths remain mysteries (American Indian Mafia p. 323. The book is available in hard-copy or as a searchable e-book).

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